Anti-Semitism in Russia in 2000: An Overview

Introduction
Violence Against Jews
Anti-Semitism in Politics
Ultranationalist Organizations
Hate on the Internet
Russia's Response to Anti-Semitism
What Needs to be Done

Related ADL Articles:
David Duke in Russia

ADL Moscow Office


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Hate on the Internet

Russian ultranationalists of various shades increased their presence on the Internet in 2000. As of December, there were at least 64 Russian Web sites and three large Web portals regularly engaged in distributing anti-Semitic, racist and hate propaganda online.

There has been little indication that Russian law enforcement takes racist and anti-Semitic Web activities seriously.
Although most of the Internet access providers have adopted policies prohibiting dissemination of racist materials by their clients or subscribers, few monitor the Web pages and sites they host. When alerted to a particular hate site, some of the providers responded quickly by denying service to groups and individuals that engaged in hate propaganda. More common, however, is a situation when a Russian Internet provider does not have a proper user agreement or when hatemongers use Internet providers based outside of Russia, allowing them to pursue hate activities without restrictions.

As the Internet becomes available to increasing numbers of Russians hate groups can share information and freely disseminate materials. Yet, there has been little indication that Russian law enforcement takes racist and anti-Semitic Web activities seriously.



Next: Russia's Response to Anti-Semitism


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2001 Anti-Defamation League