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Illustration by Robert Casilla.  Copyright (c) by Houghton Mifflin Company.  
Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Company.  All rights reserved.
Illustration by Robert Casilla. © by Houghton Mifflin Co.
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RacismRacism
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Books in this category address a wide range of historical and current forms of bigotry, prejudice that is both intentional and systemic and prejudice that is unintentional, but just as hurtful. In some books prejudice is the primary focus of the story; in others it is part of the fabric of the book but not its central theme.
This is whichCatvalue: 6
 
   Book Results for:
Racism
 
1.   A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass
David A. Adler (Author), Samuel Byrd (Illustrator)
A biography of the man who after escaping slavery, became an orator, writer and leader in the abolitionist movement.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
2.   A Picture Book of George Washington Carver
David A. Adler (Author), Dan Brown (Illustrator)
A brief biography of the African-American scientist who overcame tremendous hardships to make important discoveries in the field of agriculture.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
3.   A Picture Book of Jackie Robinson
David A. Adler (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)
The story of the first African American to play major league baseball in the United States.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
4.   A Picture Book of Jesse Owens
David A. Adler (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)
A short biography of a sharecropper's son who became a four-time Olympic gold medallist.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
5.   A Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr.
David A. Adler (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)
A short biography of the civil rights leader and Nobel Peace Prizewinner.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
6.   A Picture Book of Rosa Parks
David A. Adler (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)
The story of the woman who came to be known as the "mother of the Civil Rights Movement." .
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
7.   A Picture Book of Sitting Bull
David A. Adler (Author), Samuel Byrd (Illustrator)
The biography of the leader of the Hunkpapa Sioux.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
8.   Africa Is Not a Country
Margy Burns Knight (Author), Anne Sibley O’Brien (Illustrator)
Enter into the daily life of children in the many countries of modern Africa. Countering stereotypes, "Africa is not a Country" celebrates the extraordinary diversity of this vibrant continent as experienced by children at home, at school, at work, and at play.
[Grade Level: 1 - 4]
 
9.   Allen Jay and the Underground Railroad
Marlene Targ Brill (Author), Janice Lee Porter (Illustrator)
The true story of a young boy who helped a runaway slave.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
10.   Amazing Grace
Mary Hoffman (Author), Caroline Binch (Illustrator)
A young African-American girl discovers that she can do anything she sets her mind to.
[Grade Level: Pre-K - 3]
 
11.   Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky
Written by
Faith Ringgold
With Harriet Tubman as her guide, a young girl retraces the steps escaping slaves took on the Underground Railroad.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
12.   Baseball Saved Us
Dom Lee (Illustrator), Ken Mochizuki (Author)
When a Japanese-American boy and his family are interned in a camp during WWII, they decide to combat their depression by building a baseball field. During a game the boy channels his humiliation--both from being a prisoner and from being a bad player--to anger, giving him the strength to hit a game-winning home run.
[Grade Level: 2 - 4]
 
13.   Black Like Kyra, White Like Me
Judith Vigna (Author), Nadine Bernard Westcott (Illustrator)
Two young girls learn the sting of prejudice and how to work against it.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
14.   Blue Jay in the Desert
Isao Kikuchi (Illustrator), Marlene Shigekawa (Author)
This is the story of a Japanese-American boy and his family, who are interned during World War II. The boy doesn't quite understand what the internment is all about, but through his eyes we are able to see how it has affected the adults around him. The book includes a brief historical overview of the Japanese-American internment.
[Grade Level: 2 - 4]
 
15.   Cartas a mi mama
Teresa Cardenas (Author), David Unger (Adapter)
The narrator of Cartas a mi mamá is a young Afro-Cuban girl who, upon the death of her mother, is forced to live with her aunt and cousins who tease and taunt her about her dark skin color. To keep her mother’s memory alive, and to remember that she was once deeply loved for who she is, she writes letters telling "Mami" what she is feeling.
[Grade Level: 6 & Up]
 
16.   Courtney's Birthday Party
Ron Garnett (Illustrator), Loretta Long (Author)
A young girl is not allowed to invite her African-American friend to her birthday party.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
17.   Daisy and the Doll
Larry Johnson (Illustrator), Angela Shelf Medearis (Author), Michael Medearis (Author)
A young girl living in rural Vermont tells about an experience related to being an African-American student in a predominantly white community.
[Grade Level: K - 6]
 
18.   Dear Mrs. Parks: A Dialogue with Today's Youth
Rosa Parks (Author), Gregory J. Reed (Author)
Correspondence between Rosa Parks and various children in which the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement" answers questions and encourages young people to reach their highest potential.
[Grade Level: 5 & Up]
 
19.   El Chino
Written and Illustrated by
Allen Say
Billy, the son of immigrants from China, was always told by his father that "In America, you can be anything you want to be." Billy's dreams of being a famous basketball player, however, are met with laughs and comments like, "Who's ever heard of a Chinese athlete!" Billy gives up his hopes of being a great athlete and studies engineering. Years later, while visiting Spain, Billy's dreams are reawakened when he falls in love with bullfighting and defies expectations to become the first Asian matador.
[Grade Level: 2 - 6]
 
20.   Elegy on the Death of Cesar Chavez
Rudolfo A. Anaya (Adapter), Gaspar Enriquez (Illustrator)
Chicano novelist Rudolfo Anaya was greatly influenced by the heroic life of labor and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez. This poem eulogizes Cesar and his work, expressing the grief of la gente and calling all peoples together to continue the nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice. Includes a chronology of Cesar's life.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
21.   Encounter
Written by
Jane Yolen
Told from a young Taino boy's point of view as Christopher Columbus lands on San Salvador in 1492, this is a story of how the boy tried to warn his people against welcoming the strangers.
[Grade Level: 2 - 6]
 
22.   Felita
Ray Cruz (Illustrator), Nicholosa Mohr (Author)
A family experiences prejudice when they move to a new neighborhood.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
23.   First Day in Grapes
L. King Perez (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)
First Day in Grapes tells the story of Chico, a young boy and his family, migrant workers who move up and down the state of California. Every September they pick grapes and Chico starts a new school. Often Chico gets picked on because he’s always “the new kid” and because he speaks Spanish sometimes. The story focuses on Chico’s first day of third grade at a new school- things are a little different this time. Chico learns to be proud of his abilities in math and to stand up for himself when some other students bully him and make fun of his heritage. Also in Spanish, as "Primer Dia en Las Uvas."
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
24.   Flowers from Mariko
Deneen Jenks (Author), Michelle Reiko Kumata (Illustrator), Rick Noguchi (Author)
When Mariko and her family are released from the Japanese American internment camp where they have spent the last three years, Mariko plants a garden to surprise and cheer up her family.
[Grade Level: K - 6]
 
25.   Forgotten Victims of the Holocaust
Written by
Linda Jacobs Altman
Altman explores the expansion of Nazi Germany and the effect it had on the people of the countries that were invaded, including Poles, Russians, Gypsies, Homosexuals and others. She uses memories of survivors to discuss the experiences of those who were tortured and killed by the Nazis.
[Grade Level: 5 - 9]
 
26.   Freedom Summer
Jerome Lagarrigue (Illustrator), Deborah Wiles (Author)
In the summer of 1964 two boys, one white and one black, play together and want to swim in the newly-integrated pool, and are dismayed to find that prejudice still exists.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
27.   Gettin' Through Thursday
Nneka Bennett (Illustrator), Melrose Cooper (Author)
Andre dreads Thursdays. Thursday is the day before Mama gets paid at work each week - and the day when money is tight and spirits are low for Andre and his older brother and sister. As report card day approaches, Andre is excited because he anticipates making the honor roll, and Mama has promised a royal party for just such an event. But to Andre's dismay, report card day falls on a Thursday. This is a tale of how, despite limited means, a single mother and her children find a creative way to celebrate a son's achievement.
[Grade Level: 2 - 6]
 
28.   Goin' Someplace Special
Patricia C. McKissack (Author), Jerry Pinkney (Illustrator)
In segregated 1950s Nashville, a young African-American girl experiences a series of indignities and obstacles to get to one of the few integrated places in town, the public library.
[Grade Level: K - 6]
 
29.   Granddaddy’s Gift
Margaree King Mitchell (Author), Larry Johnson (Illustrator)
In this story, a young African-American woman reminisces about her grandfather's determination to vote in 1960s segregated Mississippi. When a lawyer addresses a local gathering looking for volunteers to register to vote, the girl's grandfather is the only one to step forward. Granddaddy Joe braves racist taunts and passes a test on the Mississippi Constitution to become the first black registered voter in town. Fearful neighbors shun Granddaddy and his family, but when their church is set on fire, the black community unifies and joins Granddaddy in registering.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
30.   Growing Up Biracial: Trevor's Story
Bethany Kandel (Author), Carol Halebian (Photographer)
Ten-year-old Trevor Sage-el describes his life at home and at school, his feelings about being the son of a white mother and a black father, and what he likes and does not like about being biracial. “Sometimes people ask me, ‘What are you?’,” observes Trevor. “I usually answer, ‘Human.’ I have friends of all colors. I don’t want to have to choose between black and white. I’m both, and I like it.”
[Grade Level: 2 - 6]
 
31.   Guests
Written by
Michael Dorris
Set in Massachusetts during the time of the first Thanksgiving, a young Algonquin boy is alarmed when the annual harvest feast is threatened by the arrival of strange new people.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
32.   Happy Birthday Martin Luther King
Jean Marzollo (Author), J. Brian Pinkney (Illustrator)
An easy-to-read biography of Dr. King.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
33.   Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom
Rae Bains (Author), Larry Johnson (Illustrator)
The biography of a girl whose fight to freedom was the first step in her becoming "conductor" on the underground railroad.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
34.   Heroes
Dom Lee (Illustrator), Ken Mochizuki (Author)
A Japanese-American boy's playmates insist that he always play the "bad guy" in their war games until the boy's father and uncle intervene by showing up at the playground in their WW II uniforms.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
35.   Hope
Isabell Monk (Author), Janice Lee Porter (Illustrator)
After someone asks whether she's "mixed", second-grader Hope, a biracial child, wonders what that means. Her great aunt assures her that as the child of a white father and an African-American mother, she represents "generations of faith mixed with lots of love.” As she listens to Aunt Poogee recount her family’s history and the story behind her name, Hope learns to feel proud of her biracial heritage and how to handle questions about her racial status in the future.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
36.   I Am Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks (Author), Jim Haskins (Author), Wil Clay (Illustrator)
The woman whose acts of civil disobedience led to the 1956 Supreme Court order to desegregate buses in Montgomery, Alabama, explains what she did and why.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
37.   I Have a Dream
Martin Luther King, Jr. (Author), Coretta Scott King (Author)
This edition of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s “I Have a Dream" speech is illustrated by fifteen recipients of the Coretta Scott King Award, which recognizes African American authors and illustrators. Signed statements from the artists explain the emotions they were tying to capture and why and how they used certain colors and tones. This book evokes the sound of King's voice as it was captured on that historic August day in 1963.
[Grade Level: 1 & Up]
 
38.   I Speak for the Women
Brian Liedahl (Illustrator), Stephanie Sammartino McPherson (Author)
A story about Lucy Stone, powerful speaker for women's rights and the abolition of slavery.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
39.   Ida B. Wells-Barnett: A Voice against Violence
Ned O. Berkeley (Illustrator), Frederick McKissack (Author), Patrick McKissack (Author)
A biography of the female journalist who campaigned for the civil rights of women and other minorities and was a founder of the NAACP.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
40.   If a Bus Could Talk: The Story of Rosa Parks
Written by
Faith Ringgold
A contemporary schoolgirl boards the bus on which Rosa Parks rode in 1955, and the bus tells the girl about Rosa's story, from growing up with the constant threat of a Ku Klux Klan attack to her act of passive resistance against the segregation of bus passengers.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
41.   Iggie's House
Written by
Judy Blume
This re-issue of Judy Blume's classic 1970 novel dealing with racism and housing segregation still strikes a chord. 11-year-old Winnie is quick to make friends with her new neighbors, the Garbers, who are the first African-American residents of the neighborhood (“The Garbers were black and Grove Street was white and always had been”). Winnie is distressed when another neighbor organizes a petition to pressure the Garbers into moving, and frustrated that her parents are initially ambivalent on the issue. Winnie tries to help her neighbors, and the Garber kids accuse her of befriending them only because she thinks it is “cool” to have black friends. The story has a positive resolution when the racist neighbor decides to move and Winnie makes up with the Garbers.
[Grade Level: 4 - 7]
 
42.   Jar of Dreams
Written by
Yoshiko Uchida
A young girl watches her family cope with financial pressures and racial prejudice.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
43.   John Lewis in the Lead: A Story of the Civil Rights Movement
James Haskins (Author), Kathleen Benson (Author), Benny Andrews (Illustrator)
This illustrated biography celebrates the life of a living legend of U.S. history, a sharecropper’s son who grew up to become a major civil rights leader. Stirred by his experience of segregation and inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Lewis joined Dr. King and other civil rights leaders after graduating high school, and was in the forefront of the major civil rights protests of the 1960s. In the face of physical attacks, he persevered with dignity and a devotion to nonviolence, helping southern black people gain the right to vote. Lewis has continued his commitment to human rights since that time and, in 1986, he was elected to represent Georgia in the U.S. Congress, where he continues to serve today.
[Grade Level: 3 - 5]
 
44.   Journey Home
Written by
Yoshiko Uchida
After their release from an American concentration camp, a Japanese-American girl and her family try to reconstruct their lives amidst strong anti-Japanese feelings which breed fear, distrust, and violence.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
45.   Journey to Topaz
Donald Carrick (Illustrator), Yoshiko Uchida (Author)
Like any 11-year-old, Yuki Sakane is looking forward to Christmas when her peaceful world is suddenly shattered by the bombing of Perl Harbor. Uprooted from her home and shipped with thousands of West Coast Japanese Americans to a desert concentration camp called Topaz, Yuki and her family face new hardships daily.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
46.   Julia Ward Howe
Written by
Elizabeth Raum
A biography of the nineteenth-century peace and social justice activist who wrote the Mother’s Day Proclamation in 1870 calling for a “Mother’s Day for Peace,” which eventually led to the holiday known today as Mother’s Day. Ward is most famous for writing the poem that became "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" and is also known for her work against slavery and in support of a woman’s right to vote.
[Grade Level: 2 - 4]
 
47.   Jump at de Sun: The Story of Zora Neal Hurston
Lucy Ann Hurston (Author), A. P. Porter (Author)
The story of author Zora Neale Hurston and her battles against racism and poverty.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
48.   Juneteenth Jamboree
Yvonne Buchanan (Illustrator), Carole Boston Weatherford (Author)
Cassandra and her family have moved to her parents' hometown in Texas, but it doesn't feel like home to Cassandra until she experiences Juneteenth, the Texas tradition that celebrates the end of slavery.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
49.   Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters
Stephen Alcorn (Illustrator), Andrea Davis Pinkney (Author)
Let It Shine is a collection of short biographies celebrating the contributions of 10 black women who moved forward the cause of civil rights in America. Following a preface that describes her own family roots in the civil rights movement, Pinkney presents her heroines chronologically in verbal portraits that capture the subjects' faith, strength of character, and determination in the face of hardships and racial injustice. The subjects—who are depicted in full-page oil paintings — include Sojourner Truth, Biddy Mason, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Mary McLeod Bethune, Ella Josephine Baker, Dorothy Irene Height, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
50.   Let Them Play
Margot Theis Raven (Author), Chris Ellison (Illustrator)
In 1955 the all-black Cannon Street YMCA All-Stars team was formed in Charleston, South Carolina in the hopes of playing in the state’s annual Tournament, but all of the white teams pull out of the official Little League program rather than play against All-Stars. This boycott gives the team a legitimate spot in the Little League Baseball World Series held in Pennsylvania, but while the team is invited to attend as guests, they are not allowed to participate since they have not officially “played” and won their state’s tournament. The title of this true story takes its name from the chant shouted by the spectators who attended the World Series final.
[Grade Level: 1 - 5]
 
51.   Linda Brown, You Are Not Alone: The Brown V. Board of Education Decision
Joyce Carol Thomas (Author), Curtis E. James (Illustrator)
This book is a collection of ten personal accounts of the the court ruling and the emotions and consequences that accompanied it.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
52.   Loving v. Virginia: Interracial Marriage
Written by
Karen Alonso
This book explores the Supreme Court case that challenged and eventually overturned Virginia's anti-miscegenation law in response to Richard and Mildred Loving's arrest in 1958 for being partners in an interracial marriage. The author contextualizes the case by discussing the laws and movements from Colonial times to the present that pertain to interracial marriages. A glossary, discussion questions and suggestions for further investigation are included.
[Grade Level: 6 & Up]
 
53.   Loving v. Virginia: Lifting the Ban against Interracial Marriage
Written by
Susan Dudley Gold
Part of the Supreme Court Milestones series, this book explores the case that challenged and eventually overturned Virginia's anti-miscegenation law in response to Richard and Mildred Loving's arrest in 1958 for being partners in an interracial marriage. The book traces the court case from its historical roots to its continuing impact today and shows readers how cases proceed through the court system. A list of Web sites and cases and statutes related to the decision are included for further investigation.
[Grade Level: 6 & Up]
 
54.   Mr. Lincoln's Way
Written and Illustrated by
Patricia Polacco
A story about Mr. Lincoln, the school principal's efforts to get the school bully, to help him attract birds to the school's new atrium.
[Grade Level: K - 6]
 
55.   My Brother Martin: A Sister Remembers Growing Up with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Christine King Farris (Author), Chris K. Soentpiet (Illustrator)
Renowned educator Christine King Farris, older sister of the late Dr. King, recalls the birth of her two younger brothers and reflects on life in the King household from the vantage point of an older sibling. Using simple language, she describes race relations in the South during her childhood, shares the lessons that the King children learned from their family about standing up for justice and equality, and sets the stage for the historic journey that her brother would embark upon in the years to come.
[Grade Level: 2 - 4]
 
56.   Night Golf
Cedric Lucas (Illustrator), William Miller (Author)
A young African-American boy finds his way around the racial barriers of the 1960s and learns to play golf.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
57.   Niña Bonita
Ana María Machado (Author), Rosana Faria (Illustrator)
The story of an albino bunny that loves the beauty of a girl's dark skin and wants to find out how he can get black fur.
[Grade Level: Pre-K - 3]
 
58.   Nothing Wrong with a Three-Legged Dog
Written by
Graham McNamee
Keath and his best friend Lynda are in the fourth grade. Some kids call Lynda Zebra," because her mother's black and her father's white. And Keath is "Whitey." "He's vanilla in a chocolate school" where Toothpick, a bully, has it in for him. Lynda and Keath both love dogs. Dogs don't care about what color is the right one. Dogs don't hate anybody. Their favorite dog is Leftovers, Lynda's three-legged beagle. When he got hurt, his first owners gave up on him, but Lynda and Keath turn him into a winner, a pooch that shows Keath that sometimes it's good to stand out, to be special, and that even when you look different, there are ways to fit in.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
59.   Ola Shakes It Up
Joanne Hyppolite (Author), Warren Chang (Illustrator)
Nine-year-old Ola and her family have moved to an all-white suburban neighborhood, and she and her brother and sister must adjust to being the only black students in their school. Though her old home was in a rough Boston neighborhood, it was familiar and Ola loved it. After several weeks in her new community, Ola accepts that her family is not going to move back to the city, so she devises a plan to transform her new neighborhood into a place she can call home.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
60.   Pink and Say
Written and Illustrated by
Patricia Polacco
The story of Pinkus Aylee who during the Civil War saved Sheldon Russell Curtis, the author's great, great grandfather.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
61.   Precious Gold, Precious Jade
Written by
Sharon E. Heisel
A young woman befriends a Chinese family despite the racism and fear that overwhelm the residents of her small mining town at the end of the gold rush.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
62.   Primer Dia en Las Uvas
L. King Perez (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)
Primer Dia en Las Uvas (First Day in Grapes) tells the story of Chico, a young boy and his family, migrant workers who move up and down the state of California. Every September they pick grapes and Chico starts a new school. Often Chico gets picked on because he’s always “the new kid” and because he speaks Spanish sometimes. The story focuses on Chico’s first day of third grade at a new school- things are a little different this time. Chico learns to be proud of his abilities in math and to stand up for himself when some other students bully him and make fun of his heritage. Originally written in English.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
63.   Quien Es de Aqui?
Margy Burns Knight (Author), Anne Sibley O’Brien (Illustrator), Clarita Kohen (Adapter)
Who Belongs Here? tells the story of Nary, a young boy fleeing war-torn Cambodia for the safety of the U.S. To some of his new classmates, however, he is a 'chink' who should go back where he belongs. But what if everyone whose family came from another place was forced to return to his or her homeland? Who would be left? This story teaches compassion for refugees while sharing the history of immigration to the U.S. and some of the important contributions made by past immigrants.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
64.   Richard Wright and the Library Card
Gregory Christie (Illustrator), William Miller (Author)
A true story about author Richard Wright and his determination to borrow books from the public library that turned him away because of the color of his skin.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
65.   Rosa Parks
Wil Mara (Author), Jeanne Clidas (Author)
A short introduction to the life of the woman whose actions led to the desegregation of buses in Montgomery, Alabama, in the 1960s and who was an important figure in the early days of the civil rights movement.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
66.   Rosa Parks, My Story
Jim Haskins (Author), Rosa Parks (Author)
The story of a woman whose decision not to give up her seat on a bus in 1955 turned the Civil Rights Movement into a national cause.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
67.   Rosa Parks: From the Back of the Bus to the Front of a Movement
Written by
Camilla Wilson
This book takes a close look at Parks' early life, and follows her political career after the Montgomery bus boycott.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
68.   Speed of Light
Cliff Nielsen (Illustrator), Sybil Rosen (Author)
A young girl living in the South during the 1950s struggles with the anti-Semitism and racism which pervade her small community.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
69.   Story of Latino Civil Rights: Fighting for Justice
Jose E. Limon (Author), Miranda Hunter (Author)
Today, there are millions of Hispanics in the country, spread across every state of the nation. They are the fastest growing minority in the United States-but the fact that they are spread out tends to weaken their influence in any single region. Hispanics must unite to make their case known. This book explains both the history and the current reality of the Latino civil rights movement.
[Grade Level: 4 & Up]
 
70.   Story of Sacagawea: Guide to Lewis and Clark
Written by
Della Rowland
A non-romanticized biography that provides ethnographic information as well as historical background on the Lewis and Clark expedition.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
71.   Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt
Deborah Hopkinson (Author), James Ransome (Illustrator)
A young girl stitches a quilt with the map pattern she used to escape to freedom.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
72.   Sweet Land of Liberty
Deborah Hopkinson (Author), Leonard Jenkins (Illustrator)
On Easter Sunday in 1939, singer Marian Anderson performed at the Lincoln Memorial for over 75,000 people. The person largely responsible for putting her there was a white man, Oscar Chapman, assistant secretary of the interior under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. When Chapman learned that Anderson was not allowed to sing at Constitution Hall because of the color of her skin, he took it upon himself to find her an appropriate venue for a concert and make an important statement about equality. With support from the highest levels of U.S. government, Chapman helped produce a landmark concert that - for at least one evening - bridged the color divide to bring a city and much of the nation together.
[Grade Level: K-4]
 
73.   Sweet Words So Brave: The Story of African American Literature
James Michael Brodie (Author), Jerry Butler (Illustrator), Barbara K. Curry (Author)
A survey of the history of African-American literature, from slave narratives to the present, told in the voice of a grandfather to his granddaughter.
 
74.   Tales from Gold Mountain: Stories of the Chinese in the New World
Simon Ng (Illustrator), Paul Yee (Author)
Stories about the prejudice and adversity faced by early Chinese Americans.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
75.   Tar Beach
Written and Illustrated by
Faith Ringgold
Based on the author's quilt painting of the same name, a young girl dreams of flying above her Harlem home claiming all she sees for herself and her family.
[Grade Level: Pre-K - 3]
 
76.   The Adventures of Connie and Diego/Las Aventuras de Connie y Diego
Maria Garcia (Author), Malaquias Montoya (Illustrator)
Tired of being laughed at because they are different, a pair of multicolored twins runs a way to ask the animals where they belong.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
77.   The Bus Ride
William Miller (Author), John Ward (Illustrator)
A young African-American child protests an unjust law in this story loosely based on Rosa Parks' historic refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1953.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
78.   The Friendship
Max Ginsburg (Illustrator), Mildred D. Taylor (Author)
Children learn dignity and pride in the face of racism.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
79.   The Gold-Threaded Dress
Written by
Carolyn Marsden
In Thailand she was named Oy, but in the U.S. they call her Olivia. Other things are not so easy to change. When Oy draws a portrait of herself, her classmate makes fun of her and calls her Chinese. And the popular girl Liliandra barely speaks to her, until she sees a photo of Oy's special Thai dancing dress from her grandmother, and wants to wear it. Oy risks shaming her family to win Liliandra's approval, as she searches for acceptance in a complex culture and learns to treasure all that she is.
[Grade Level: 2 - 5]
 
80.   The Jacket
Andrew Clements (Author), McDavid Henderson (Illustrator)
Phil, a young white boy, accuses Daniel, an African-American boy, of stealing Phil's brother's jacket, and both boys learn a lot as they uncover the truth about the jacket.
 
81.   The NAACP: An Organization Working to End Discrimination
Written by
Andrew Santella
This book traces the history of one of the nation's oldest and most important civil rights organizations, from the formation of the Niagara Movement on 1905 to modern-day protests over the flying of Confederate flags. Prominent NAACP leaders--such as W.E.B. DuBois, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Thurgood Marshall--are profiled and milestones in the struggle for equal rights are discussed, including anti-lynching and desegregation efforts. The book includes a timeline, glossary and lots of photographs that break up the text and make the book accessible to younger readers.
[Grade Level: 3 - 6]
 
82.   The Old African
Julius Lester (Author), Jerry Pinkney (Illustrator)
Based on an Ybo slave legend and infused with magical realism, this is the story of an elderly slave, Jaja, who can draw the pain of others into his mind and hones this skill when captured in Africa, dragged into a slave ship, and carted to Georgia. Jaja uses the power of his mind to ease the suffering of his fellow slaves and eventually lead them back to Africa. The graphic text and illustrations depict the horror and brutality of slavery.
[Grade Level: 4 - 8]
 
83.   The People Shall Continue
Written by
Simon Ortiz
Traces the progress of the Indians of North America from the time of the Creation to the present.
[Grade Level: 2 - 6]
 
84.   The Rabbits’ Wedding
Written and Illustrated by
Garth Williams
The reissue version of this 1950s classic tells the sweet story of two little rabbits who plan a wedding and live “happily ever after in the friendly forest.” It became the subject of controversy because it dealt with the marriage of a black to a white rabbit, and was removed from circulation in some locales for promoting racial integration. Though the book was never intended to be about race (Williams created rabbits of different colors so his young readers could tell the two apart), it can be used to normalize and celebrate interracial relationships.
[Grade Level: Pre-K - 2]
 
85.   The Secret to Freedom
Larry Johnson (Illustrator), Marcia Vaughn (Author)
Great Aunt Lucy tells the story of her slave days when she and her brother learned the quilt code to help direct other slaves, and eventually her brother too to freedom in the north.
[Grade Level: K - 6]
 
86.   The Sneetches and Other Stories
Written by
Dr. Seuss
Four rhyming stories address the social issues of prejudice, conflict, similarities and differences, and the fear of the unknown.
[Grade Level: Pre-K - 3]
 
87.   The Story of Ruby Bridges
Robert Coles (Author), George Ford (Illustrator)
The story of a young girl who confronted the hostility of the white community when she became the first African-American in Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans in 1960.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
88.   The Tin Heart
Karen Ackerman (Author), Michael Hays (Illustrator)
Two girls find a way to preserve their friendship even though the Civil War has torn their families apart.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
89.   The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights
Written by
Russel Freedman
This book is a chronological account of one of the nation's greatest African-American vocalists, from her childhood in Philadelphia through her acclaimed U.S. and European concert tours in the 1920s and 1930s. Though Anderson did not set out to be a political activist, her prominence put her in a position to expose the injustices of segregation. Anderson’s historic 1939 Easter concert at the Lincoln Memorial—a response to the Daughters of the American Revolution's refusal to allow her to appear at Constitution Hall—is a milestone in both musical and civil rights history. The book includes archival photographs and a selected bibliography and discography.
[Grade Level: 4 - 9]
 
90.   This Land Is My Land
Written and Illustrated by
George Littlechild
Through his own words and paintings, acclaimed Native artist George Littlechild takes us back in time to the first meeting between his Plains Cree ancestors and the first European settlers in North America.
[Grade Level: 2 - 6]
 
91.   To Be A Drum
Evelyn Coleman (Author), Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson (Illustrator)
A father tells his children how Africans were brought to America as slaves, but promises his children that as long as they can hear the rhythm of the earth, they will be free.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
92.   Triumphs and Struggles for Latino Civil Rights
Written by
Bárbara C. Cruz
Over 42 million Latinos live in the United States, making up America's largest ethnic minority group. As their population grows, Latino people and organizations continue to fight for improved education, equal employment opportunities, and fair immigration laws. Author Barbara C. Cruz describes the long journey of Latinos in the United States, from the founding of the oldest city on the American mainland at St. Augustine, Florida, to the continued struggle for civil rights today.
[Grade Level: 4 & Up]
 
93.   Vatsana's Lucky New Year
Written by
Sara Gogol
Vatsana is a twelve year old girl who was born in Portland, Oregon to Laotian parents. She sometimes wishes that her parents would be more American but learns to appreciate her Laotian culture when she runs into racism, prejudice and hatred.
[Grade Level: 6 & Up]
 
94.   Walking the Road to Freedom
Jeri Ferris (Author), Peter E. Hanson (Illustrator)
A story about Sojourner Truth.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
95.   We Are All The Same Inside
Written and Illustrated by
Timothy D. Bellavia
Using a multi-media format, children are introduced to Sage—an alien with no outside skin—who explores diversity and teaches that we are all the same on the inside. Information about doll workshops and instructional materials available at http://www.weareallthesameinside.com.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
96.   What Would You Do?
Katherine Altieri (Illustrator), Amarpal Khanna (Illustrator), Los Angeles Dream Dialogue, 1998-2000 (Author), Joanna Marcuse (Illustrator)
Three stories, each presenting a dilemma, written by California teens to assist younger children in resolving difficult life situations.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
97.   When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson
Pam Muñoz Ryan (Author), Brian Selznick (Illustrator)
Marian Anderson is best known for her historic concert at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, which drew an integrated crowd of over 75,000 people in pre-Civil Rights America. While this momentous event showcased the uniqueness of her character, and the struggles of the times in which she lived, it is only part of her story. This portrait of Anderson takes us from her childhood, singing in church, to her rejection from a music school that barred "colored" people, to her rise to prominence despite the racial barriers of the times. The book includes evocative illustrations and lyrics from some of Anderson's songs.
[Grade Level: 1 - 5]
 
98.   White Lilacs
Written by
Carolyn Meyer
A young girl's community is threatened when white people decide to forcibly relocate African-American families to make room for a new park.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
99.   White Socks Only
Evelyn Coleman (Author), Tyrone Geter (Illustrator)
A grandmother tells the story about her first trip into town during the days of segregation in Mississippi.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
100.   Whitewash
Ntozake Shange (Author), Michael Sporn (Illustrator)
Based on an actual incident, this book tells the story of a young African-American girl who is distressed when a gang of white boys attacks her and her brother on their way home from school and spray-paints her face white. Told from the perspective of the young target of the attack, the story shows how she begins to recover from the incident through grieving and the support of her family and friends.
[Grade Level: 2 - 5]
 
101.   Who Belongs Here? An American Story
Margy Burns Knight (Author), Anne Sibley O’Brien (Illustrator)
Young readers are asked to explore the human implications of intolerance.
[Grade Level: K - 6]
 
102.   Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree
Ying-Hwa Hu (Illustrator), William Miller (Author), Cornelius Van Wright (Illustrator)
The story of young Zora Hurston and the lessons she learned from her mother.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
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