ADL HOME |  EDUCATION HOME |  A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute |  ABOUT |  CONTACT      
Illustration by Robert Casilla.  Copyright (c) by Houghton Mifflin Company.  
Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Company.  All rights reserved.
Illustration by Robert Casilla. © by Houghton Mifflin Co.
Book Search By:
Title, Author, ISBN,
Keyword
Biography
Cultural & Religious Groups
 • African/African-American
 • Arab/Arab-American
 • Arab/Arab-American
 • Asian/Asian-American
 • Biracial/Multiracial
 • Central American
 • Christian
 • European/European-
American
 • Hindu
 • Hispanic/Hispanic-
American
 • Immigrants
 • Interfaith
 • Inuit
 • Israeli/Palestinian
 • Jewish
 • Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/
Transgender
 • Middle-Eastern
 • Migrant workers
 • Muslim
 • Native American
 • People with Disabilities
 • South American
 • South Asian/South Asian-
American
Customs & Traditions
Families & Friends
Folktales, Legends & Poems
Prejudice & Discrimination
Books in this category reflect the people of the world's nations, religions, and cultures, sometimes as a central feature of the story and other times as part of the story's background.
This is whichCatvalue: 2
 
   All Books in the Cultural & Religious Groups Category
 
  How the Birds Changed Their Feathers: A South American Indian Folk Tale
Retold and Illustrated by
Joanna Troughton
This tale, told by the Arawak people of Guyana, explains how there came to be such brightly colored birds on Earth.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
  How the Rooster Got His Crown
Written by
Amy Lowry Poole
The retelling of a Miao folktale from Western China about the day the sun refused to come out for fear of a skillful archer's arrows.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
  How the Stars Fell from the Sky: A Navajo Legend
Lisa Desimini (Illustrator), Jerrie Oughton (Reteller)
A Navajo folktale that explains the patterns of stars in the sky.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
  How Two-Feather Was Saved From Loneliness
Written and Illustrated by
C. J. Taylor
The Abenaki legend of how fire and corn came into the world.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
  I Am Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks (Author), Jim Haskins (Author), Wil Clay (Illustrator)
The woman whose acts of civil disobedience led to the 1956 Supreme Court order to desegregate buses in Montgomery, Alabama, explains what she did and why.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
  I Have a Dream
Martin Luther King, Jr. (Author), Coretta Scott King (Author)
This edition of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s “I Have a Dream" speech is illustrated by fifteen recipients of the Coretta Scott King Award, which recognizes African American authors and illustrators. Signed statements from the artists explain the emotions they were tying to capture and why and how they used certain colors and tones. This book evokes the sound of King's voice as it was captured on that historic August day in 1963.
[Grade Level: 1 & Up]
 
  I Love You Like Crazy Cakes
Rose Lewis (Author), Jane Dyer (Illustrator)
A woman describes how she went to China to adopt a special baby girl. Based on the author's own experiences.
[Grade Level: Pre-K - 3]
 
  I See the Rhythm
Toyomi Igus (Author), Michele Wood (Illustrator)
A visual and poetic introduction to the history of African-American music.
[Grade Level: 4 - 6]
 
  If a Bus Could Talk: The Story of Rosa Parks
Written by
Faith Ringgold
A contemporary schoolgirl boards the bus on which Rosa Parks rode in 1955, and the bus tells the girl about Rosa's story, from growing up with the constant threat of a Ku Klux Klan attack to her act of passive resistance against the segregation of bus passengers.
[Grade Level: K - 3]
 
  Iggie's House
Written by
Judy Blume
This re-issue of Judy Blume's classic 1970 novel dealing with racism and housing segregation still strikes a chord. 11-year-old Winnie is quick to make friends with her new neighbors, the Garbers, who are the first African-American residents of the neighborhood (“The Garbers were black and Grove Street was white and always had been”). Winnie is distressed when another neighbor organizes a petition to pressure the Garbers into moving, and frustrated that her parents are initially ambivalent on the issue. Winnie tries to help her neighbors, and the Garber kids accuse her of befriending them only because she thinks it is “cool” to have black friends. The story has a positive resolution when the racist neighbor decides to move and Winnie makes up with the Garbers.
[Grade Level: 4 - 7]
 
Back to Top  


Back to Top   




Subscribe to the Children’s Bibliography Newsletter

Related Links:
ADL Curriculum Connections
•  Assessing Children's Literature
•  The Miller Early Childhood Initiative of A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute
Using Children's Literature to Increase Empathy and Help Students Cope with Bullying
Israel Book Connections

Resources
All Kinds Of…Todo Tipo De…Tout Kalite

Creating an Anti-Bias Learning Environment

Hate Comes Home

ADL Online Catalog

Featured Books Archive