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International

International Extremism and Global Anti-Semitism


Summary of Policy and Recommendations 

  • In this decade, anti-Semitic violence and attitudes have surged around the globe.
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  • Anti-Semitic propaganda continues to thrive in the Muslim and Arab world, and is then disseminated throughout the world via satellite television and the Internet. Anti-Semitic stereotypes are regularly featured in print and broadcast media, on television and in popular fiction.
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  • The U.S. must take a leadership role in mobilizing government efforts to confront anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia, homophobia and all forms of hatred and bigotry.
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  • The United States should continue to play a leadership role in international organizations, especially within the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and through its Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR).
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  • The U.S. must continue to use intergovernmental forums and international organizations to encourage legislative, judicial and educational action to fight anti-Semitism, and encourage the improvement of data collection of anti-Semitic hate crimes.


  • The U.S. must make clear to leaders in the Arab and Muslim world that anti-Semitism will not be tolerated, and that they must condemn and combat the anti-Jewish propaganda in their media and popular culture. 


  • The U.S. should enhance its own training of international law enforcement in the area of monitoring and responding to hate crimes.
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  • The U.S. must maintain support for the monitoring of international anti-Semitism by the Department of State and the Special Envoy for Combating and Monitoring Anti-Semitism. The Department of State should expand its efforts to train diplomats stationed abroad in methods for monitoring anti-Semitic incidents and assessing data collection. 


  • ADL believes that the United States should support educational programs at home and abroad to diminish prejudice and to teach the universal lessons of the Holocaust.

Background 

In this decade, anti-Semitic violence and attitudes have surged around the globe. In France, Belgium, Great Britain, Canada and elsewhere, there have been scores of incidents where Jews and Jewish institutions have been violently attacked. Incidents include the firebombing of synagogues and Jewish schools, the physical and verbal abuse of Jews in the street, and cemetery desecrations. 

At the same time, anti-Semitic propaganda continues to thrive in the Muslim and Arab world, and is then disseminated throughout the world. Anti-Semitic stereotypes of Jews seeking world domination, controlling industry, government, and the media, as well as ancient anti-Jewish falsehoods such as the blood libel, are regularly featured in print and broadcast media, in a television series and in popular fiction. These messages of hate are then transmitted everyday from the Middle East to homes throughout Europe, Africa, North and South America and Asia via satellite television and the Internet. 

Beyond the Jewish community, the problem of intolerance and hate violence is a fact of everyday life in far too many countries where there are inadequate laws and other safeguards to prevent hate crime and to support victims.  The U.S. must take a leadership role in mobilizing government efforts to confront and denounce anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia, homophobia and all forms of hatred and bigotry.    

Beginning in 2002, the U.S. Congress and Administration played a central role in urging the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) to respond to a spike in anti-Semitic, racist, and xenophobic hate violence.  Since then, U.S. leadership has been critical in helping the organization prompt Participating States to make important commitments to address hate crime through legislation, education and law enforcement training.  The OSCE’s Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) includes a new Tolerance and non-Discrimination Department with dedicated staff to focus on specific issues like anti-Semitism, racism and xenophobia, discrimination against Muslims and issues such as hate crime reporting.  Through this work, OSCE has become the lead inter-governmental body raising awareness about new forms of anti-Semitism in what continues to be a poisonous and politicized environment. The United States should continue to play a leadership role in international organizations, especially OSCE and its Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR), promoting the adoption of hate crime laws, improving the response of government officials to hate violence, and helping to build the capacity of civil society organizations to complement and support these government efforts.   

The U.S. must continue to use intergovernmental forums and international organizations to encourage legislative, judicial and educational action to fight anti-Semitism, and encourage the improvement of data collection of anti-Semitic hate crimes. The U.S. must make clear to leaders in the Arab and Muslim world that anti-Semitism will not be tolerated, and that they must condemn and combat the anti-Jewish propaganda in their media and popular culture.   

The U.S. must continue to demonstrate its commitment to combating anti-Semitism through ongoing support for the monitoring of international anti-Semitism by the Department of State and the Special Envoy for Combating and Monitoring Anti-Semitism. In addition, the Department of State should expand its efforts to train diplomats stationed abroad in methods for monitoring anti-Semitic incidents and assessing data collection.   

The U.S. should enhance its own training of international law enforcement in the area of monitoring and responding to hate crimes. Domestic police officials have come to appreciate the law enforcement and community benefits of tracking hate crime and responding to it in a priority fashion. By compiling statistics and charting the geographic distribution of these crimes, police officials may be in a position to discern patterns and anticipate an increase in racial tensions in a given jurisdiction. 

Finally, the Anti-Defamation League believes that the United States should support educational programs at home and abroad to diminish prejudice and to teach the universal lessons of the Holocaust.  

Printable Version
ADL Recommendations to RNC and DNC Platforms (.pdf)
Related Press Release
ADL Submits Policy Priorities to Democratic and Republican Platform Committees (7/21/08)
RELATED
Statements on Issues Related to the 2008 Campaign
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