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CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS LIBRARY
Curriculum Connection Home In This Issue
In This Issue

According to Cox Communications and the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 93% of youth in the U.S. are online and 73% have a cell phone. For the current generation of teens, IM-ing, text messaging, social networking and tweeting are a vital means of self-expression and a central part of their social lives.

There are increasing reports, however, that some youth are misusing Internet and cell phone technology to bully and harass others, and even to incite violence against them.  According to a study by the Cyberbullying Research Center, approximately 20% of young people reported experiencing cyberbullying in their lifetimes.  Another study by Cox Communications and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children indicates that about 1 in 10 teens have cyberbullied someone online or by text message and 16% have seen or heard of a friend who bullied others.  For some of these youth, online cruelty may be a precursor to more destructive behavior, including involvement in hate groups and bias-related violence.

The impact of bullying has been well documented—studies have shown that difficulty making friends, loneliness, low self-esteem, depression, poor academic achievement, truancy and suicide are all associated with being bullied.  In addition to these risk factors, the targets of cyberbullying may be subject to additional distress due to the pervasive and invasive nature of modern communication technology: cyberbullying messages can be circulated far and wide in an instant and are usually irrevocable; cyberbullying is ubiquitous—there is no refuge and victimization can be relentless; and cyberbullying is often anonymous and can rapidly swell as countless and unknown others join in on “the fun.”

Despite the prevalence and impact of cyberbullying, many adults are unaware of the problem due to a lack of fluency in new technologies, limited involvement in and oversight of youth online activity, and strong social norms among youth against disclosure of online behavior.

This issue of Curriculum Connections provides educators with the tools to increase awareness about the problem of cyberbullying among their students.  Each lesson introduces age appropriate information and skills that encourage youth to think critically about Internet communication, develop empathy for others, respond constructively to cyberbullying and online aggression and interact safely on the Internet.  The resources in this edition of Curriculum Connections will be an important part of your school’s broader
efforts to foster an increased culture of e-safety and respect for differences among youth.








IN THIS ISSUE   
Lesson Plans
  • Elementary Level Lesson
  • Middle Level Lesson
  • Secondary Level Lesson
  • Entire Unit (.pdf format)
Resources on Cyberbullying & Internet Safety
  • ADL Cyberbullying Home Page
  • Glossary of Cyberbullying Terms
  • Internet Safety Strategies for Students
  • Cyberbullying Resources
  • Responding to Cyberbullying
  • Workshops on Cyberbullying
  • ADL Model Bullying Prevention Law
  • Hate on the Internet: A Response Guide for Educators and Families
Hate on the Internet
A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute Recommended Multicultural and Anti-Bias Books for Children
A CLASSROOM OF DIFFERENCE Programs and Resources
THE MILLER EARLY CHILDHOOD INITIATIVE of A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute
Holocaust Awareness and Remembrance® Institute
Combating Anti-Semitism





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