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Extremism  
Neo-Nazi Hate Music: A Guide RULE Types

Posted: November 4, 2004


Introduction
Origins
Types
Themes
Bands
Distributors and Labels
The Subculture

Hate music fans refer to their music in different ways, with few universally agreed upon conventions.  There are no hard and fast definitions; the musical subgenres influence and blend into each other, and also change somewhat over time.  But the following rough typography of style illustrates the main strains of hate music. 

 

  • Racist Oi!/RAC:  The oldest genre of hate music is derived from Oi!, an offshoot of punk music that originated in the 1970s and became heavily associated with the emerging skinhead subculture.  Most early Oi! bands were not racist, but in the wake of Skrewdriver, some racist Oi! bands emerged, sometimes calling their music "Rock Against Communism."   The term Oi! itself was not coined until the 1980s.

 

  • Hatecore:  Hatecore is essentially a racist version of hardcore punk, a musical subgenre that emerged in the U.S. in the early 1980s.  Some hardcore punk musicians later merged it with heavy metal music to create thrash or speed metal; there are racist versions of this as well.

 

  • National Socialist Black Metal Music (NSBM):  A racist version of black (or death) metal music, itself descending from heavy metal and hardcore punk.  NSBM originated in Scandinavia in the late 1980s and still bears that region's cultural influences.  Sometimes NSBM is less explicitly white supremacist than other subgenres, and often it adds a vehemently anti-Christian component that the other subgenres lack.

 

  • Nationalist Folk Music:  Sometimes known as folkish music or national socialist folk music, this term refers to songs and music that hearken back to a mythical, often Aryan, Germanic, or otherwise nationalistic past.  In such music racism is often implied rather than explicit, which is one reason why it is more popular in some European countries such as Germany, where explicitly white supremacist lyrics may be illegal.

 

  • Others:  Almost any type of music can be infused with white supremacist themes.  Racist music distributors may sell racist country music or rockabilly, or racist techno or electronica music.  There is still even a market for marches and songs from the Nazi era of the 1930s-40s.  However, these are far less popular than the above subgenres.




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2004 Anti-Defamation League